SIP-adus Workshop 2020

Speakers List

Moderator

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    Takashi Ohguchi

    Director
    Advanced Mobility Research Center, Institute of Industrial Science
    The University of Tokyo
    Japan

    Prof. Oguichi, born in Tokyo 1964, graduated Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo (UTokyo) in 1988 and got Ph.D from Graduate School of Engineering of UTokyo in 1993. After joining to Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., he moved to Tokyo Metropolitan University, and promoted to Professor in 2007. He moved to Institute of Industrial Science (IIS) of UTokyo in 2011 and assigned to director of Advanced Mobility Research Center (ITS Center) of IIS, UTokyo, in 2018. He is also a member of Mobility Innovation Collaborative Research Center (UTmobI) started in July 2018 in the university, and is in charge of education for the department of civil engineering at UTokyo. His major research field is Traffic Engineering and Traffic Management and Control including advanced traffic signal control, advanced highway network traffic management systems, integrated transport and mobility system design including automated vehicles, harmonized design of infrastructure facilities and hierarchical road transport system. He also serves as the chair of Business Promotion Working Group of Japanese national project SIP-adus (Cross-Ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program in the Innovation of Automated Driving for Universal Services).

Speaker

  • Christine Eisenmann

    Christine Eisenmann

    Team Leader "Transforming Automobility"
    Department of Passenger Transport
    Institute of Transport Research, German Aerospace Center (DLR)
    Germany

    Dr. Christine Eisenmann (former Weiß) is team leader of the Transforming Automobility Group of the Passenger Transport Department since August 2018. Previously, she worked at the Institute for Transport Studies (IfV) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) from 2012 to 2018. Her research interests include car ownership and car use, acceptance of new mobility concepts and technologies (e.g., electric mobility, autonomous driving), panel and longitudinal analyses of travel behaviour as well as environmental impacts of transport.

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    Torsten Fleischer

    Head of Research Group 'Mobility Futures'
    Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS)
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
    Germany

    Torsten Fleischer is head of the research group ‘Mobility Futures’ at the Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Originally a physicist by training, he is now interested in the interdependence between societal change and technological change especially in the areas of transportation, information and energy technologies, in methodological questions of technology assessment as well as in the governance of innovation processes. Over the years, he served as project manager for several TA studies for ITAS and the Office of Technology Assessment at the German Parliament (TAB).

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    Bart van Arem

    Professor
    Transport & Planning
    Delft University of Technology
    The Netherlands

    Bart van Arem is a full professor Transport Modelling at Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands, He is also deputy chair of the department Transport & Planning and director of the TU Delft Transport Institute.

    His research focuses on analysing and modelling the implications of intelligent vehicles. Such implications vary from human factors to traffic flow on roads and networks. The research has a strong modelling and simulation component based on empirics wherever possible using our instrument vehicles and driving simulator.

    He is the Principal Investigator of the project "Spatial and Transport impacts of Automated Driving" (2016-2021, comprising 30 partners from academia, government and industry. www.stad.tudelft.nl.

    He is Editor in Chief of the IEEE Open Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems. www.ieee-itss.org/oj-its

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    Hiroaki Miyoshi

    Professor
    Doshisha University
    Japan

    Hiroaki Miyoshi is a professor at the Graduate School of Policy and Management at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan. His research interests include public economics and transport economics.

  • Ayako Taniguchi

    Ayako Taniguchi

    Professor
    Systems and Information Engineering
    University of Tsukuba
    Japan

    Ayako Taniguchi is Professor of Risk Engineering at University of Tsukuba, Japan. She has a PhD in Engineering. Her current research objective is to apply psychological strategies to manage social dilemmas concerning urban planning and transportation policy, and research interests include promotion of public transport, traffic injury prevention analysis, and risk communication.
    She began working on the social acceptance of autonomous vehicles (AVs) in 2016. She designed and analyzed interview and questionnaire survey with transportation operator and general public in Japan, the UK and Germany. From 2019, she is conducting research on how the automobile has been accepted in Japanese society by applying historical sociology and folklore, analyzing newspapers from the end of the 18th century and television programs from the 1950s. By looking back at this past history, she would like to aim to gain insight into the social acceptance of AVs.

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    Kosuke Tanaka

    Assistant Professor
    Department of Civil Engineering
    Tokyo University of Science
    Japan

    Brief Personal History
    Mar.2016 Doctor of Engineering, Kyoto University
    Apr.2016 Research Fellowship for Young Scientists, JSPS
    Apr.2017 Assistant Professor, Tokyo University of Science

    Field of Study: Infrastructure Planning and Management
    Research Theme: Consensus Building, Public Opinion, The Media, Behavior Change

  • Satoshi Nakao

    Satoshi Nakao

    Assistant Professor
    Urban Management
    Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University
    Japan

    I focus on approaches based on history and folklore to solve traffic problems.